Three other major events took place in Europe to fully establish the Christian

The writings of the Venerable Bede (written around 700AD in a monastery in Jarrow in Northumberland founded by the St Patrick movement) are a testimonial to this.(e.g. his “Ecclesiastical History of the English People”).

Three other major events took place in Europe to fully establish the Christian Church across Europe.
The Roman Byzantium Empire centred in Constantinople was not over run by the Germanic tribes as befell Rome
Pope Leo 3rd in about 800 came to a deal with the effective Emperor of Europe, Charlemagne, and crowned him Emperor of the Western Church or Holy Roman Emperor. (Charlemagne was of German stock whose court was in Aachen/Aix-la-Chapelle in the west of Germany.) On Charlemagne’s death the crown passed to the German Kings. The best remembered of course being the Habsburgs whose court was in Vienna Austria and then perhaps Charles 5th from Burgundy now in France who also became king of Spain and Naples in Italy The succession of the Holy Roman Empire remained solid until 1800 when it collapsed under Napoleon.
Perhaps the most holy, respected and useful activities of the Christian church were their monasteries which were centres for dedicated religious people to live, work and pray, generally eight times a day. They became the best brains of their day and most importantly did good works in their neighbourhood. This took the form of creating books for reading before printing was invented, teaching, the only real source of education at the time, and such things as helping local farmers with capital projects they could not afford like draining the land. The men and women who lived in monasteries took vows to spend their lives doing good works in the name of God. Marriage was disallowed for monks and nuns. The first simple monasteries were set up in Ireland by St Patrick where one of their key jobs was to make copies, by hand of course, of all the vital Christian books being rapidly destroyed by the Saxons and Vikings in England.

Some call him the father of the Christian church.

Saint Augustine of Hippo (354-430)
Some call him the father of the Christian church. Born in Thagaste close to the North African Roman town of Carthage (modern day Tunisia) he took a Christian wife and was finally converted to Christianity by the Roman Bishop of Milan St Ambrose. As Bishop of Hippo (300 miles west of Carthage in present day Algeria) he wrote the most influential books on Christianity for more than 800 years. Of particular interest and importance to the English was his influence on the Roman Britain St Patrick who became the patron saint of Ireland who travelled to Hippo to learn from him.
Christianity comes to England

THE HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE. THE IRISH EFFECT. SAINT PATRICK. MONASTERIES.

1500 years ago

The next milestone in the development of the Roman Christian church came in 590AD though the powerful dogma of Pope Gregory 1st More than anybody he was responsible for removing any government control over the Church. (He had to come to an agreement with the ruling race in northern Italy at the time, the Lombards of Milan, one of the Germanic tribes who assisted in the fall of the Roman Empire)
Pope Gregory sponsored his emissary Augustine to fully convert England, then ruled by the Saxons, to Christianity. This was the first organised plan to spread Christianity to England. Around the same time Irish missionaries (Columba 521-597) who had been converted to Christianity by the Irish St Patrick movement, landed on the west coast of Scotland. Both movements survived the vicious pagan Viking invasions into both England and Ireland between 800 and 1000 AD.

And I believe in the Holy Ghost the Lord giver of life, Who proceedeth from the father

And I believe in the Holy Ghost the Lord giver of life, Who proceedeth from the father and the Son, Who with the father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified, Who spake by the prophets. And I believe in one Catholic and Apostolic Church. I acknowledge one baptism for the remission of sins. And I look for the Resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come”. Amen

This creed lasted with very little competition for over 1000 years that is until the Reformation (circa AD 1500). However in the hundred or so years before it was agreed, the Christian church welcomed debate and intellectual speculation. The opposite would be the case as the Roman Popes fostered theological conformity. Particularly and not surprisingly, in the 2nd century there was much debate about the Holy Trinity (God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit being one and the same thing.)

The breakthrough came with the conversion of the Roman Emperor Constantine

The breakthrough came with the conversion of the Roman Emperor Constantine in AD 312 who set about making Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire. Things moved quickly. Constantine changed the name of the eastern capital of the Roman Empire from Byzantium to Constantinople (After himself) and set up important religious colleges in the attractive local countryside. One by the lake called Nicaea. (Now in Turkey and called Iznik some 100 miles south east of Istanbul). From this college, the Roman Christian religious clerics produced a written document (in 325 AD) stating what Christians should believe. (It is now called the Nicaean Creed. The Latin for “I believe” is “Credo”). It is still used today as follows:
THE NICAEAN CREED
“I believe in one God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, And of all things visible and invisible: And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten son of God, Begotten of his Father before all worlds, God of God Light of Light, Very God of very God, Begotten not made, Being of one substance with the Father, By whom all things were made.

Who for us men, and for our salvation came down from Heaven, And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary, And was made man, And was crucified by Pontius Pilot, He suffered and was buried, And on the third day he rose again according to the scriptures, And ascended into Heaven, And sitteth on the right hand of the Father. And he will come again with glory to judge both the quick and the dead: Whose kingdom shall have no end.

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